Author Topic: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway  (Read 12130 times)

Holly Harry

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #50 on: April 23, 2009, 06:23:00 PM »
I haven't seen Lost Highway in a while, but I think The Thin Red Line is one of the best war films ever made. What I love so much about Malick's films, is that, with maybe the exception of Fellini, he makes movies that are the most indicative of how human beings see the world. Through memory, internal thought, intense focus on one particular thing, he's the closest filmmaker to capture what it's like to...live. And I don't think it's that important to know a lot about each particular character, I think they all represent a collective consciousness, in a way.
"Political questions, if you go back thousands of years, are ephemeral, not important. History is the same thing over and over again."-Woody Allen.

THATguy

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #51 on: April 23, 2009, 06:38:19 PM »
Alright, some more about Lost Highway (as the Mrs. would rather watch America's Next Top Model than a movie with me).

I found myself blissfully bewildered but at the same time, completely and totally engrossed.  The complete change of tone halfway through didn't work for me... for about 10 minutes.  Then, when things started to tie together (about as much as they possibly will in a movie like this), it was like a light clicked and I was completely back in it.

I'm referencing Inland Empire again, but it's 3 hour running time felt like a Ken Burns series by the time it was said and done, while for Lost Highway, it felt just about right at a shade over 2.

Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #52 on: April 23, 2009, 07:11:10 PM »

Italian romantic fatalism

Do go on...

Sam, any plans at all to explain what you meant by this?
The death at the end. Just reminded me of that kind of romanticized deaths that Italians used in their war films.

pixote

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #53 on: April 25, 2009, 02:04:58 PM »
This thread needs more verdicts.

pixote
I think I'd love how awkward it'd be, or how awkward it should be.

Clovis8

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #54 on: April 25, 2009, 02:29:23 PM »
This thread needs more verdicts.

pixote

I agree. I am curious to see more discussion of both films. My feelings on the TTRL are known but I have also felt that Lost Highway is so obtuse it has always been my least favorite Lynch. I would love to be converted on one or both these films.

íKeith!

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #55 on: April 25, 2009, 05:29:02 PM »
This thread needs more verdicts.

pixote

I agree. I am curious to see more discussion of both films. My feelings on the TTRL are known but I have also felt that Lost Highway is so obtuse it has always been my least favorite Lynch. I would love to be converted on one or both these films.

huh - I disagree, Dune is easily more obtuse ;D

I hadn't watched this since it initially came out on DVD.  Haneke lifts the whole mysterious videotape thing from this doesn't he? Aesthetically I simply prefer Lynch's unnatural lighting, clean lines and aggressive use of sound more than Malick's natrural everything.  Man>Nature.  Also I think Lynch is the only decent horror director consistently working in movies today.  This, Inland Empire (which for the record is better) are two of the most frightening films I've ever seen.  The interplay of sound + vision is so unnerving (unlike Eraserhead which is simply shocking) and yet riveting at the same time.  Obviously script and plot take a back seat in these films but there is enough there to propel you thru the madness.  Its strange when the film is outdoors in the daylight its much less interesting - as though the things that give Malick his power to captivate work opposite for Lynch.

Clovis8

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #56 on: April 25, 2009, 06:54:25 PM »
When I say Lost Highway is my least favorite Lynch its not an insult to the film. I love lynch and have enjoyed my couple attempts at LH even though I am often confused.

Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #57 on: April 26, 2009, 12:04:37 PM »
Wait, Lost Highway was directed by Lynch. You mean that hack who spends all his free time doing new age meditation beat out Malick who actually creates meditative films?

And I thought I had bad tastes.  >:(

JokerXgg

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #58 on: April 26, 2009, 09:49:19 PM »
Sorry for the LONG DELAY!

CONTAINS SPOILERS


Lost Highway Vs. The Thin Red Line

Lost Highway


Directed by David Lynch was the first thing I knew about this movie. In other words I knew that i was going to be thrown around a few times in Lynch's brain twister. This movie, first of all, was extremely creepy. The videos showing up at his doorstep with no proof of who it was. The investigators not knowing what was causing the crime. This whole movie was full of suspense. The Good looking decent man whom Fred meets at the party:



To be quite honest, this movie was something that I was not expecting to be as good as it was. It kept me entertained and wanting to find more and more about all the characters. I thought it was a greats twist when Fred morphs into Pete, and when this happened I was hooked more into the movie. What did the morph mean? maybe a second chance in life. This movie reminded me a lot of a history of violence (living a second life) etc. I really enjoyed this whole movie, and it was something i didn't have to pause to take a break from.

The Thin Red Line

Usually, I hate War movies because they don't hook me. the last war movie I enjoyed a lot was full metal jacket and it was because it was funny (at times) and had great music. This movie was 3 hours long, and to be honest they did not feel like 3 short hours. Things that I want to point out about this movie is the shots of nature. There seem to be a lot of focus on random inanimate objects, which i found to be quite interesting. This movie was very interesting, and I find the reason for that to be because of the solid cast it has. I think John Cusack did a marvelous job throughout the whole movie. I loved the way Malick was able to show the relations between the soldiers and the foreigners, because most movies tend to miss important details like that. This movie had its up and downs for me.


 


Verdict

I enjoyed both films, and im sure i would have picked either of them if they weren't going against each other. Seeing as I can only choose one, Lost Highway will go on because it was a film I loved.
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Clovis8

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Re: 90s US Round 5: The Thin Red Line vs. Lost Highway
« Reply #59 on: April 26, 2009, 09:56:13 PM »
LOL the screenshot from TTRL is of TREES!   ;D