Author Topic: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments  (Read 11512 times)

PeacefulAnarchy

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #40 on: February 14, 2012, 12:06:22 PM »
I'm not joking, I think the distinction offered by the Academy between score and soundtrack is absurd. The use of songs, original or not, should be considered soundtrack and orchestration, original or not, should be considered score. Like FLY says, these two things serve very different function within a film and the distinction of originality has nothing to do with that function.
Well, the Academy probably makes that distinction to promote the use of original scores and not have long dead composers nominated for score. I don't think they're making an artistic distinction and it's not like they have an award for best soundtrack that accepts non-original compositions.

I do agree that from the perspective of watching a film the difference between original or not is not particularly relevant and should stand on the artistic merits of how it fits into a film.

That said the only soundtrack or score that I remember and have positive associations with are Badlands and Drive. If I notice a score or soundtrack then it's no longer complementing the film but overtaking it and, except for rare instances, that's not a good thing. Also in the case of Drive, even though I just watched it a couple of months ago I could not tell you if there was an actual score beyond the songs.

Bondo

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #41 on: February 14, 2012, 12:12:02 PM »
You make a good point about why the Academy does what it does...it needs to actually give the award to a person rather than a film. Thus it makes sense to stress original scoring and original songs over soundtracks of mixed/unoriginal songs.

But for the purpose of our list, which awards films, this makes less sense. So I'd say either make it instrumental vs. lyrical or just get rid of the distinction altogether and just have a top 100 "uses of music in film" that combines original and unoriginal, instrumental or lyrical. Fro deserves credit on this latter suggestion.

Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #42 on: February 14, 2012, 12:26:16 PM »
Yea, for the purpose of the list, I'm for this method.

FLYmeatwad

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #43 on: February 14, 2012, 12:33:16 PM »
So I'd say either make it instrumental vs. lyrical

I prefer this because it still allows us to focus on the distinct way each type of music functions in film, though I wouldn't be adverse to a catch all award either. I prefer keeping the idea of score/soundtrack (or instrumental/lyrical) separate as well, but that's mostly a personal thing.

Either result would be a massive victory for The Movement(tm).

MartinTeller

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #44 on: February 14, 2012, 01:09:53 PM »
So I'd say either make it instrumental vs. lyrical or just get rid of the distinction altogether and just have a top 100 "uses of music in film" that combines original and unoriginal, instrumental or lyrical. Fro deserves credit on this latter suggestion.

I agree, those sound like two sensible options that should minimize the amount of splitting hairs.
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ses

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #45 on: February 14, 2012, 08:24:52 PM »
I would rather do two lists:   Instrumental and Lyrical if that is better than Score and Soundtrack.  For me they are two different things.  We are not giving out awards to individual, so we could include those instrumental that are original in the same categories as other instrumental pieces.  If you think it works well with that particular film, then why not vote for it. 
« Last Edit: February 14, 2012, 08:33:29 PM by ses »
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AAAutin

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #46 on: February 14, 2012, 08:53:09 PM »
Well, my working assumption of the difference between score vs. soundtrack has always been that score is original music composed specifically for a film, while soundtrack refers to a compilation of music from a film, both original and licensed.

For the purposes of this list, I don't see much benefit in a split. I'd prefer the catch-all of "Best Score/Soundtrack" or:

top 100 "uses of music in film"

ses

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #47 on: February 14, 2012, 08:56:21 PM »
top 100 "uses of music in film"

This says something different to me than picking a score or soundtrack as a whole.
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AAAutin

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #48 on: February 14, 2012, 09:09:24 PM »
Yeah, I suppose the wording is vague (it could be construed to mean a specific moment or manipulation), but I approve of the concept.

Bondo

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Re: Filmspotters' Top Scores and Soundtracks: Comments
« Reply #49 on: February 14, 2012, 09:55:07 PM »
Yeah, I meant music for the film as a whole, not singular musical cues.