Author Topic: Inglourious Basterds  (Read 60426 times)

bb6634

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Inglourious Basterds
« on: August 21, 2009, 03:08:48 AM »
Just came back from midnight screening.  Apologies if this is somewhat incoherent.   There is so much here, so much I need to parse... 
 -This movie is in love with movies.  It exists within  its' own world, its' own history, which bares very little relation to ours.  Call it Tarentinoland.   IB has some epic historical revisionism that would give World War 2 historians coronaries, but within the world that Tarentino builds not only is it acceptably,  it's exactly what I wanted.   The audience I was with went into a cheering frenzy when Donowitz guns down Hitler.   
 -Surprised how little the Inglorious Basterds of the title are actually on the screen;  they are definitely the center of the movie but it is as much about the    Shosanna Dreyfus character as it is the Basterds.
-Christoph Waltz is a lock for best supporting actor.  Lock.  Put all the money on this cause there is no way he is not getting nominated.  Out-standing performance!
-The pacing is all over the place and I suspect there is a longer version of this film.  Hopefully we'll get it on the DVD release.
-There are scenes that don't work and one musical cue - a David Bowie song - that pulled me completely out of the film.  And not just any David Bowie song but the theme to Cat People, which, I am sure QT was alluding to in the sequence it being placed.  Still, didn't work.
-the Mike Myers cameo had people in giggles, which I don't think was the intent.
-Great-  No, let me re-phrase: GREAT use of Ennico Morricone.   Wow, to hear the Master on the big screen. Absolute treat!
I can't wait to see it again.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2009, 07:45:56 PM by pixote »

Variable

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2009, 04:01:44 AM »
there was a musical cue that I found odd but I don't know if it was that song. when Hitler was first shown in his room, I think around when the soldier is being brought in.

ditto on Waltz, phenomenal.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2009, 02:39:49 PM by Variable »

sdedalus

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2009, 06:27:15 AM »
Loved the pacing: chapter splits make it move like a series of short films stitched together into one epic narrative.  Same structure as Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill and Reservoir Dogs, no?

Like every other Tarantino film, it takes its time building character and suspense through dialogue. 

I don't know how a music cue can pull you out of one of his films, doesn't his style demand you be half outside of it at all times?

I really dug it from start to finish.  Haven't been this happy with one of his films since Kill Bill Vol. 1.
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philip918

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2009, 01:15:10 PM »
Liked this a lot more than I thought I would since, for some reason, the trailers really didn't do that much for me.

Went to a Midnight show and even at two-and-a-half hours it didn't feel long. 

The performances are all very good to outright exceptional.  Christopher Waltz is as good as all the hype.  He is absolutely hilarious and ridiculously scary at the same time.  Brad Pitt is equally funny as the zealous Nazi hunter, and Michael Fassbinder is awesome as a British operative that joins the Basterds.  I even liked Eli Roth quite a bit, which I never, ever would have thought possible.

The violence is brutally funny.  Just so over-the-top you can't help but chuckle as you cringe.

The ending is one of the most outrageous, thrilling and just plain fun things I've seen on screen this year.

Variable

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2009, 02:39:14 PM »
Loved the pacing: chapter splits make it move like a series of short films stitched together into one epic narrative.  Same structure as Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill and Reservoir Dogs, no?

Like every other Tarantino film, it takes its time building character and suspense through dialogue. 

I don't know how a music cue can pull you out of one of his films, doesn't his style demand you be half outside of it at all times?

I really dug it from start to finish.  Haven't been this happy with one of his films since Kill Bill Vol. 1.

I absolutely, 100% loved the movie, in case that wasn't clear (though I think you were talking more to the OP than me).

but one music cue made me laugh so I figured I'd mention it (I literally turned to a friend and said 'what a weird music cue'). I wouldn't change it for anything, because the whole package was thoroughly enjoyable. chalk it up to me not wanting to gush TOO much, and taking a cue from the OP and something I remembered from the theater.

I enjoyed Myers scene. I laughed a couple of times but I don't think it was unwanted... at the least by Myers, and unless Tarantino is blind by him too.

I loved the flashback for the one bastard, I wish I could remember the names. the one who killed all the nazis so they recruited him. that was some funny and brutal stuff.

bb6634

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2009, 03:06:26 PM »

I don't know how a music cue can pull you out of one of his films, doesn't his style demand you be half outside of it at all times?


I don't think his style demands that you have to be outside at all time.  I get what QT is doing, whether it be playing with film iconography or genre without being pushed outside the story.  I was in that world almost throughout the entire movie even with the usual QT affectations. But it was keeping to period detail up on till then.  When that song was played it felt way too contemporary and pulled me out, at least temporarily.  But this is a minor quibble.  I absolutely loved this film.   

FLYmeatwad

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2009, 03:52:54 PM »
Chapter 5 was the best.

sdedalus

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2009, 04:01:34 PM »

I don't know how a music cue can pull you out of one of his films, doesn't his style demand you be half outside of it at all times?


I don't think his style demands that you have to be outside at all time.  I get what QT is doing, whether it be playing with film iconography or genre without being pushed outside the story.  I was in that world almost throughout the entire movie even with the usual QT affectations. But it was keeping to period detail up on till then.  When that song was played it felt way too contemporary and pulled me out, at least temporarily.  But this is a minor quibble.  I absolutely loved this film.   

I can see that.  I think I felt the same way when Mad Men used a Decemberists song at the start of a Season 2 episode.  After the initial shock though, it really works.

I think the Bowie song works the same way in that even though it isn't period appropriate, it is mood appropriate.  I really didn't notice it at all, in fact.

I haven't seen mentioned yet, but also loved: the uncredited voices of Samuel L. Jackson and Harvey Keitel.
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Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2009, 04:19:01 PM »
I didn't like this film. Had too many bad sensibilities. More on this in the near future.

sdedalus

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Re: Inglorious Basterds
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2009, 05:46:05 PM »
Glenn Kenny on Inglourious Basterds's structure and the audacity of making a 2 1/2 hour film that has only 16 scenes.
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