Author Topic: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film  (Read 42661 times)

Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #90 on: May 22, 2010, 10:02:20 AM »
I'm with corndog on this one. I don't dislike the film, but I don't get why everyone loves it.

Bondo

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #91 on: May 22, 2010, 10:54:15 AM »
I don't have a special place for the film of To Kill A Mockingbird. I never read the story but I saw a stage version of it before ever watching the film and preferred the live version. I think the film is less a great film than a good telling of a great story.

Bill Thompson

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #92 on: May 22, 2010, 04:46:24 PM »
I'm with Ses, I didn't see TKAM until last year, and my father was a deadbeat I never knew, so I don't have the nostalgia you spoke of Corn. The reasons Ses listed are pretty much the same was what I would have said anyways.  :)

FLYmeatwad

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #93 on: May 22, 2010, 09:11:12 PM »
Make it Umberto D.

Corndog

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #94 on: May 25, 2010, 04:28:53 PM »
pixote
The 400 Blows
Directed by Francois Truffaut; Written by F. Truffaut & M. Moussy

So I guess that guy from Close Encounters directs too? Well, okay, whatever. My French New Wave education is quite shallow to this point. I have seen Godard's Breatless and, courtesy this marathon, Renais' Last Year at Marienbad. Past that I know nothing of the movement. I had always heard of this film and been curious about Truffaut's work in general, so when the chance arose, I was definitely excited and had fairly high expectations, even though I knew nothing of the plot of the film. At a somewhat short 96 minutes, I was not expecting such a simple, slow moving storyline. The film follows Antoine (Jean-Pierre Leaude) who is a school boy in Paris with some problems. He feels as though his mother does not love him and treats him poorly, and he is frustrated with his school responsibilities, resorting to skipping or even plagiarism. When he finally breaks free and runs away he gets caught and sent to an observation center.

Until the third act, I was not hooked by what was going on on screen. The acting was great, the look was good, but I was never pulled into the character of Antoine, I could not find sympathy for his actions. None of them made sense to me and I could not relate to him as I would not have done any of the things he did, nor have I experienced some of the hardships he was experiencing. That is until the third act when he gets sent to the observation center. It is what happens here, one scene in particular, and the masterful ending that brought it all back to me and got me to appreciate what I had just seen. I was able to sympathize with Antoine and the struggles he had been through for the course of the year. Like many films I have seen before it, this is a prime example of why you must watch movies from start to finish. The ending was so rewarding and so satisfying that I can imagine seeing this again and liking it better the second time just for the simple reason that I know how it ends.

***

Up Next: Umberto D.
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."

'Noke

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #95 on: May 25, 2010, 04:33:45 PM »
I loved it a lot more then you did Corndog, but I'm glad you liked it. Nice review.
I actually consider a lot of movies to be life-changing! I take them to my heart and they melt into my personality.

tinyholidays

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #96 on: May 25, 2010, 04:45:30 PM »
pixote
The 400 Blows
Directed by Francois Truffaut; Written by F. Truffaut & M. Moussy

So I guess that guy from Close Encounters directs too? Well, okay, whatever. My French New Wave education is quite shallow to this point. I have seen Godard's Breatless and, courtesy this marathon, Renais' Last Year at Marienbad. Past that I know nothing of the movement. I had always heard of this film and been curious about Truffaut's work in general, so when the chance arose, I was definitely excited and had fairly high expectations, even though I knew nothing of the plot of the film. At a somewhat short 96 minutes, I was not expecting such a simple, slow moving storyline. The film follows Antoine (Jean-Pierre Leaude) who is a school boy in Paris with some problems. He feels as though his mother does not love him and treats him poorly, and he is frustrated with his school responsibilities, resorting to skipping or even plagiarism. When he finally breaks free and runs away he gets caught and sent to an observation center.

Until the third act, I was not hooked by what was going on on screen. The acting was great, the look was good, but I was never pulled into the character of Antoine, I could not find sympathy for his actions. None of them made sense to me and I could not relate to him as I would not have done any of the things he did, nor have I experienced some of the hardships he was experiencing. That is until the third act when he gets sent to the observation center. It is what happens here, one scene in particular, and the masterful ending that brought it all back to me and got me to appreciate what I had just seen. I was able to sympathize with Antoine and the struggles he had been through for the course of the year. Like many films I have seen before it, this is a prime example of why you must watch movies from start to finish. The ending was so rewarding and so satisfying that I can imagine seeing this again and liking it better the second time just for the simple reason that I know how it ends.

***

Up Next: Umberto D.

I'm glad you got on board with it by the end, which is, as you noted, masterful. I really love the rest of the movies as well, especially the scene where he goes on the spinning ride. But I adore New Wave and all of the slow (as you put it) letting be that that entails.

Corndog

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #97 on: May 25, 2010, 05:03:52 PM »
yea, the spinning ride was pretty cool
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."

Corndog

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #98 on: June 02, 2010, 04:34:53 PM »
skjerva
Umberto D.
Directed by Vittorio De Sica; Written by Cesare Zavattini

Like French New Wave, my education on Italian Neo-Realism is shallow too. I have seen the ultimate in De Sica's The Bicycle Thief, but past that absolutely nothing. This film is similar to De Sica's other film in many ways, but it is also very different. When I saw The Bicycle Thief, I was not blown away, nor was I hit in the gut by some powerful punch. I liked the film, I appreciated it and I took it for what it was, but I did not love it. I would have to say that I enjoyed this film a fair bit better. It follows one man, oddly enough his name is Umberto D. Ferrari. Umberto is struggling. He is a pensioner who worked for the government for 30 years and is now just scraping by. He struggles to keep his place from his landlady who demands he pay his back rent almost daily and to no avail. His only two real friends are his dog, Flike, and the landlady's maid, Maria, who happens to be quite gorgeous.

The main difference between The Bicycle Thief and Umberto D. is the character of Maria. In The Bicycle Thief, it was the man and his son. The wife was scarcely seen. But here women are represented more and she too is struggling with her pregnancy and who the father is. The whole story is pretty heart breaking. Umberto asks friends for money, or even just to have a talk and they deny him, needing to get to their bus. He even goes to a medical ward to spare himself some time with the landlady. What is worse is what happens in the third act. The Abandonment of both Maria and Flike seem so selfish and at the same time so very defeatist. Here I was truly struck with a powerful punch in the gut. There was something in his character that made me feel like he did not deserve what was happening to him. Umberto did nothing wrong, he was just struggling and it did not seem fair. But then again life is not fair. So what was he to do?

The ambiguous ending has me wondering what happened next. Like The Graduate, I was wondering whether he went on to happiness with Flike and perhaps Maria or if instead he did not get out of his rut and what we saw was just a false glimpse of hope. Again I probably fall in the naive, hopeful minority here, denying the inevitable. But I do not know. Maybe De Sica's filmmaking has zapped that from me, because I definitely felt no finality in the "happiness" of the final shot. Though I did not love the film, I certainly had a great time with it and appreciated it greatly. These realist films never seem to fully do it for me. I can see why people love them and can see where it is brilliant filmmaking, but I can never see myself watching something like this over and over again. And at the same time, I cannot see myself being so deeply affected by its images that it alters my life in some way. Still, at the end of the day, impressive filmmaking, impressive writing, and an impressive film well deserving of being someone's #1 film of all time.

*** So close to adding a 1/2

Next Up: The Third Man
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."

Corndog

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Re: Corndog Watches Your Favorite Film
« Reply #99 on: June 03, 2010, 11:11:15 PM »
Holly Harry & jrod
The Third Man
Directed by Carol Reed; Written by Graham Greene

I used to always think that Carol Reed was a woman. I always used to say to myself, "Wow, it's amazing how a woman was allowed to helm big movies back then, that's great. And they were great movies too, supposedly anyway." Well, then I started watching this and had that thought again, but then it occurred to me that maybe, just maybe, that it's just a dude called Carol; I mean John Paul II's real name was Karol. So yes, Carol Reed is a guy, and that is a surprise to me, though given the context it makes sense. So now on to the actual film that I watched. I knew nothing of the plot, the characters, none of it. I went in cold. But let me tell you, things got hot pretty quick. The story, in essence, is about a man, Holly Martins (Joseph Cotten) who arrives in Vienna to find his friend, who was supposed to put him up, had been accidentally killed in a automobile accident. But he starts to get curious as to what actually happened. What he finds is more than he bargained for. Basically there is a "Third Man" involved and Harry Lime (Orson Welles), the friend, was some kind of racketeer.

The film starts off with a cool, I want to say local, musical instrument playing and this style of music continues throughout the film. In the first few scenes I got this kind of tone that it might be somewhat sarcastic or funny, but soon enough I found it would be serious, though I kind of liked it the way it was. But nonetheless, the music still continues, which somewhat irked me because then it started to not fit the tone of the film and it sometimes got annoying, though it was used less as the film continued on. I was always kept wondering about the conspiracy though, I never knew what to think exactly and I was always involved in the film throughout the first two acts. Obviously, in addition to the great tension, the strongest point of the film was the cinematography. It was stunningly beautiful and the use of the canted angle was marvelous. Some might say it was over used, as sam suggested in his recent review of Slumdog Millionaire, but what I loved about it there and here is that it creates that tension. Yea, some might feel that is too in your face and obvious, but it made me uneasy and always questioning what was happening. Especially when Holly did not know what was going on. It was just composed so well. And then of course the tunnel sequences were astounding and a visual treat. The other technical aspects were quite good too. The acting was good, but I also noticed the editing in some points, but in a good way. Sometimes there were some fast edits that I did not care for, but for the most part I noticed it as adding to the tension and creating that great atmosphere.

I had a lot of fun with this film, and like The 400 Blows, the final act was marvelous. Unlike that other film, however, The Third Man involved me all the way through and I had a genuine concern for the outcome of the film. The ending, while I would not say perfect, was pretty cool too, especially the very last shot itself. It was very satisfying and involved some interesting dilemma/decision making. This is definitely something that I can see watching again, and also something that may get better with repeat viewings. Good pick Holly Harry and jrod!

***1/2

Next Up: I gotta imagine High Fidelity, especially since it fulfills two marathons. But I guess anything could happen.
"Time is the speed at which the past decays."