Author Topic: Top 5 double features  (Read 7370 times)

eig

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Top 5 double features
« on: October 13, 2006, 10:27:14 PM »
I watched Network last night, probably for the first time since I saw it in the theater 30 years ago.

The scene where Peter Finch shows William Holden an old picture of Edward R. Murrow got me thinking about the contrast in TV news as portrayed in Goodnight and Good Luck and Network.

So what about movies that should be watched together?

karlwinslow

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Top 5 double features
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2006, 10:47:29 PM »
Me and my friend would "double feature" when we went to the movie theater.  Buy a ticket, sneak into a movie after yours is over.  We saw The Proposition and The Da Vinci Code, Lady in the Water 5 min of Vice City and Clerks II, and something else to go along with Superman.

That's not what you meant by double feature though huh?

eig

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« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2006, 10:51:52 PM »
Uh no, not exactly. But hey, it was a good try.  :-)

choatime

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« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2006, 11:16:15 PM »
I think Network and Good Night would make a good pair to compare and contrast; however, Network is really the only film that I can think of that makes me want to go read a book afterwards.  It's that "Turn your televisions off!  Right in the middle of this sentence!  Turn them off right now!" part.  So it would have to go last.  

I don't know if I've got a good double feature to add, but I do have a double feature (in the sense that I watched them in relatively quick succession) where I really felt the effect of the first on the second.

Kissing Jessica Stein followed by Zoolander.  They were both due at the library the next day, and so I watched them back-to-back.  Some of the stuff (read Mugatu) in Zoolander was pretty funny.  However, at the beginning, I kept wondering what the makers of Stein could have done had they just had the money to make the set of the vast lair that the fashion head meet in.  

Zoolander really suffered from having followed the more realistic and character-driven comedy that I really liked more than I thought I might.

Maybe we should conduct an experiment.  We pick two films, A and B that we all agree to watch back-to-back.  Half of us are assigned to watch A first, and the others are given B first.  Will the groups come to different conclusions?

eig

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« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2006, 11:34:46 PM »
Yeah, I know what you mean about big budget versus no budget.

I saw The Devil Wears Prada and I really enjoyed it. But it made me think of Swimming with Sharks, which was made for practically nothing and covers much of the same territory: the fresh-faced kid trying to deal with the boss from hell.

While Prada maintains a warm and fuzzy core, Swimming with Sharks is over the edge in a very biting, satirical, witty manner. It proves that you don't need a lot of money to tell a good story.

alexarch

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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2006, 07:45:11 AM »
All very good subjects for a compare/contrast essay.  Has anyone noticed that little underused, contest thread sitting in the No Movie Talk Allowed Board?

spoko

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« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2006, 09:35:38 AM »
Quote from: "alexarch"
All very good subjects for a compare/contrast essay.


Except that—as an English major and husband to an English prof, I just have to point this out—compare & contrast essays are so 1972. Does anyone still assign them? If so, they should be summarily fired, or at least not allowed to teach above the second-grade level.

Seriously, if there isn't a more interesting way to talk about the relationship between two things, then it isn't a relationship worth discussing.

But I'm getting way off-topic.


Having thought about it recently because of The Movie Game, I would suggest a double feature of Ocean's 11 and The Good Thief. Similar heists, but very different approaches to the notion of "cool"—a notion which is really crucial to both movies, and which in my opinion both movies do a great job exploring.

alexarch

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« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2006, 03:12:25 PM »
Quote from: "spoko"

Except that—as an English major and husband to an English prof, I just have to point this out—compare & contrast essays are so 1972.
Oh you're SOOOOO sophistimicated.  Excuse me while I stick my tongue out at you, Mr. Smarty McSnobby. :P  I happen to love compare/contrast exercises, and you're dumb.  Again:   :P

spoko

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« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2006, 04:35:31 PM »
Quote from: "alexarch"
I happen to love compare/contrast exercises, and you're dumb.


Well, I love diagramming sentences. But I don't inflict it on others.

Yes, though. I am dumb; that is certain.

winrit

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« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2006, 08:41:10 PM »
Spoko, I think you should take the compare and contrast assignment as a challenge; show us what you can really do with it.  I am sure there is a way to spice it up, this isn't English class.   :)

As for double features, let me suggest a nice Halloween pairing: Bunny Lake is Missing and John Carpenter's The Thing.  Both are a little creepy and you should see both if you haven't.
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