Author Topic: 1SO Rebuilds His Top 100 of All Time  (Read 134030 times)

1SO

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Streets of Fire - One Chapter at a Time
« Reply #1360 on: February 11, 2014, 10:51:53 PM »


Streets of Fire - Rumble
"I got something special in mind."

Back on top. The blues score, the sound mix of rifles and rumbly cycles, the many unforgettable looks by Willem Dafoe and Rick Moranis finally gets knocked to the pavement. I really love this small moment…


"Well, my plan went to shit. Let's see how you do."

What follows is simply one of the greatest fight scenes I've ever seen. The choreography, editing (which often throws choreography aside), and the clang of those hammer axes as they swing with great force. I have watched this scene over and over again. It is probably the bar to which I hold all other one-on-one fights. Jackie Chan is great against a crowd, but he's never taken on one person in a scene as good as this. (2nd best might be Neo's training with Morpheus in The Matrix.)

There's so much tension in the middle as Tom forces Raven's weapon to the ground. he swings back and sees Raven's lip quivering. When Tom throws away his weapon, Raven balls up his fists and you hear it on the sound mix. We're only halfway done.


Reposted for awesomeness.

During the fistfight, the camera swings down to a reaction shot by Raven's 2nd. He realizes his boss is going to lose. I'm into this more than any similar shot from the fights in Raging Bull. (Unpopular opinion, but I said it.) The fight ends not with a knockout blow, but an inspired push. Throw in the sound of 100 rifles preparing to fire and there you have it.
Rating: * * * * *

smirnoff

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Re: 1SO Rebuilds His Top 100 of All Time
« Reply #1361 on: February 12, 2014, 05:30:58 PM »

"Well, my plan went to shit. Let's see how you do."

Loved that.

1SO

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Re: Streets of Fire - One Chapter at a Time
« Reply #1362 on: February 13, 2014, 12:46:07 AM »

Streets of Fire - "I Can Dream About You"

When it came out, the most famous thing about Streets of Fire was this song. It always made for an odd fit into the movie because when it comes up, I'm no longer in the world of the film but recognizing the song that's popular in my world. It is a good song, and still sounds good today. (What do you know, something in Streets of Fire that isn't dated.)

Meanwhile, Tom ties up loose ends. First he tells Billy Fish why he won't say goodbye to Ellen… then he says goodbye to Ellen. Sometimes, it's like they wrote the script and then put it away until it was time to film. Luckily, both scenes are reasonably well-written, the film is back to all that cool stage lighting and "I Can Dream About You" times out to be a wonderful song to say goodbye to.
Rating: * * * 1/2

1SO

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Streets of Fire - One Chapter at a Time
« Reply #1363 on: February 13, 2014, 11:35:46 PM »

Streets of Fire - "Tonight is What it Means to Be Young"

When I did Chapter breakdowns for the Pixar films, each one contained new questions and new insight with the approach. I'm a bit disappointed that Streets of Fire didn't do the same. The cool parts are still Très Cool, the bad parts still stick out and it still hangs in my Top 100 on a large nugget of creativity wrapped in a hard candy shell of nostalgia. What I learned is what you all taught me with your fresh perspectives, through your reviews and comments. It's also reassuring to read that the film gets a lot more right than wrong.

We end at the beginning. Another performance by Ellen Aim and the Attackers. Another epic rock song by Jim Steinman, coupled with Andrew Laszlo's lighting. One last scene of that amazing editing, not a moment out of place. I'm always sad to see it come to an end.
Rating: * * * *

oldkid

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Re: 1SO Rebuilds His Top 100 of All Time
« Reply #1364 on: February 14, 2014, 10:10:34 PM »
Unfortunately, I was unable to get Streets of Fire before you finished.  I should get it any day now.  I'll post a review.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

1SO

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1SO Rebuilds His Top 100 of All Time - More
« Reply #1365 on: April 18, 2014, 12:53:21 AM »
My time as an active poster on the Boards is approaching 6 years. A lot has changed in my personal life and a lot has changed in the way I view movies. Most people don't realize that when I registered, my Username was short for 1 Strong Opinion. I showed up all full of gospel, the hard belief that there are right and wrong answers in cinema. That a Top 100 list would be made of nothing but inarguable greatness. Undebatable selections.

Boy was I naive.

I learned there are people who love film, but prefer cinema that is outside the mainstream. That it's possible to hate Casablanca and not be a contrarian or a troll. Personal favorites are exactly that, personal. That between nostalgia, genre preferences and films that set off a gut reaction, people are going to come at this beast from many different angles, and while we each get something different from cinema, we all love it enough to express our satisfaction on a regular basis.

Or our dissatisfaction. During my time here, I continue to go against the grain on acclaimed filmmakers like Ozu and Fellini. Bergman is hit and miss, I'm easily bored by Italian neo-realism and I don't think Dr. Strangelove is funny. These crackpot opinions used to require strong, intelligent defenses but now it's just accepted as my personal viewpoint. (I recently posted my Ozu bias on another board and nobody wanted to hear from me after.)

The Top 100 Club has been an immensely insightful look at the taste of others. Then the mirror came back to me. I expected the reviews would contain some lesser-known classics like They Shoot Horses Don't They, but the focus was more on the titles that give my list "personal charm", like Perfume, Rope and Streets of Fire. The analysis made me more comfortable than ever looking at my list as a selection nobody will enjoy as much as myself, and that got me thinking about a list of Essentials - which is almost a summation of my time on the Boards - and a revised Top 100 which wouldn't exclude Short Films.


New Entry



More

More is 6 minutes long and very easy to find around the internet, so I would recommend watching it first because what I want to say is going to be very Spoiler-y.

I've always thought More was one of the best shorts I'd ever seen. The specific inclusion of colors into that gray world combines with the intense music - depressed but not angry - tell the story extremely well. It seems like a simple fable, and I read one review who found it too on the nose. I kind of see that, but over the years I've found a lot of ambiguity as I've come to see a lot of myself in that worker.

His memories of a happy youth have created a literal fire in his belly. A strong desire to do something and not just be one of the crowd. I've tried for years to do what I truly love and have only had brief moments of Bliss, but mostly a frustration at being unable to share my fire. In the short, the worker finds his success but it's an artificial and empty victory. He is unable to reach true joy, and the fire in his belly has gone out.

At this point in my life, I question what we're supposed to take from this ending. Would it have been better if he didn't succeed? If that idea stayed bottled up inside? Was there a better way to achieve Bliss? Something that wouldn't have taken the burning from him? I wonder if the fire in me still burns as brightly as it once did, or if I've resigned myself to this Wonderful Life while I'm waiting for all those big dreams to hit. (It's a Wonderful Life, another of my most unpopular opinions.) What will happen with my career dreams in what's left of my future and what will I take from More 6 years from now?


I will post a revised Top 100 after some more individual posts.

oldkid

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Re: 1SO Rebuilds His Top 100 of All Time
« Reply #1366 on: April 18, 2014, 01:10:31 AM »
More is a solid short, although I probably wouldn't list it as one of my favorites.  Still, the message is great, and one which we still need to learn: we don't have the answer.  We might have an answer, for now, for a time, that provides temporary relief for ourselves or many, but it isn't THE answer for everyone.  And by providing an answer, it may be that we lose the drive and joy that encouraged us to find the answer for others to begin with.

That last is certainly a lesson I've struggled with.  What is the goal-- happiness and satisfaction with life, or providing it for others.  Because it seems that we can't have both.
"It's not art unless it has the potential to be a disaster." Bansky

Bondo

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Re: 1SO Rebuilds His Top 100 of All Time
« Reply #1367 on: April 18, 2014, 01:28:57 AM »
Curiously, in my seemingly non-ending quest to figure out what I want the Bondo Collection to be, I came upon perhaps cutting the most well known/well regarded titles (even my favorites all time) in favor of a list that is more exclusively overlooked or underrated stuff, make it as personal as possible. I leaned more that way with my top-100 this past time in part with the club in mind and I feel like it is producing an interesting month.

1SO

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Re: 1SO Rebuilds His Top 100 of All Time
« Reply #1368 on: April 18, 2014, 01:33:23 AM »
...although I probably wouldn't list it as one of my favorites.
I think this will be increasingly common as I revise my Top 100, except with Rear Window where I'm just coming very late to the party.

I could see your interpretation being the true aim of filmmaker Mark Osborne (It all seems unusually insightful for someone who was only 28 at the time.) Like many great works of art, I'm still struggling with what More means to me. I can't accept that we don't have the answer because that would sap the drive.

Dave the Necrobumper

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Re: 1SO Rebuilds His Top 100 of All Time
« Reply #1369 on: April 21, 2014, 06:31:56 AM »
Spoilers ahead !!!!


Thank you for the introduction to More. What a great little film. As for the meaning of the ending and the film in general. I take it as a look at affluenza, that the creation of things from your imagine can bring happiness, but owning things themselves does not bring happiness. The people on the turntable were doing something simple, but joyful. Yes they did use a thing, but it was a communal thing so no ownership.

More really resonated with me. What another viewing would do to change the above view of the film I am not sure, but I think I will show it to my wife and find out.