Poll

What's your favorite film by William Wyler?

Hell's Heroes
0 (0%)
Counsellor at Law
0 (0%)
The Good Fairy
0 (0%)
These Three
0 (0%)
Dodsworth
0 (0%)
Dead End
0 (0%)
Jezebel
1 (3.4%)
Wuthering Heights
0 (0%)
The Westerner
0 (0%)
The Letter
0 (0%)
The Little Foxes
1 (3.4%)
Mrs. Miniver
0 (0%)
The Best Years of Our Lives
8 (27.6%)
The Heiress
1 (3.4%)
Detective Story
0 (0%)
Carrie
0 (0%)
Roman Holiday
6 (20.7%)
The Desperate Hours
0 (0%)
Friendly Persuasion
0 (0%)
The Big Country
1 (3.4%)
Ben-Hur
2 (6.9%)
The Children's Hour
0 (0%)
The Collector
2 (6.9%)
How to Steal a Million
0 (0%)
Funny Girl
1 (3.4%)
Haven't seen any
5 (17.2%)
Don't like any
1 (3.4%)

Total Members Voted: 28

Author Topic: Wyler, William  (Read 3185 times)

MartinTeller

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Wyler, William
« on: October 14, 2010, 04:24:14 PM »
« Last Edit: May 09, 2015, 06:12:25 PM by 1SO »

MartinTeller

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2010, 04:25:58 PM »
1. The Heiress
2. Dodsworth
3. The Desperate Hours
4. The Best Years of Our Lives
5. Jezebel
6. The Little Foxes
7. Roman Holiday

8. How to Steal a Million
9. The Letter

10. The Children's Hour
11. Detective Story
12. Ben-Hur
13. Wuthering Heights


« Last Edit: October 20, 2012, 12:13:46 AM by MartinTeller »

oneaprilday

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2010, 04:31:59 PM »
1. Roman Holiday
2. The Best Years of Our Lives
3. Mrs. Miniver
4. How to Steal a Million
5. Ben-Hur

Bill Thompson

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2010, 04:34:10 PM »
Good
1) Roman Holiday
2) Ben-Hur

Verite

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2010, 05:52:41 PM »
Mizoguchi studied Wyler films and admired, what he called, Wyler's vertical framing.  He also worried that his Ugetsu would lose to Roman Holiday at the Venice Film Festival.  Wyler's underrated and overlooked like, say, Raoul Walsh.  Relatively speaking, that is, most think old Hollywood and Ford and Hawks come to mind much more readily.  The Gregg Toland-Wyler association should be talked about much more.

I'm a fan of:

1. The Little Foxes
2. Dodsworth
3. The Best Years of Our Lives
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Bondo

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2010, 06:37:22 PM »
I'm not gonna count Ben-Hur since I was young when I saw it, I need to see more Wyler since both The Best Years Of Our Lives and Roman Holiday are films I really liked.

sdedalus

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2010, 07:08:22 PM »
1. Jezebel
2. Dodsworth
3. The Letter
4. Good Fairy
5. Best Years
6. Little Foxes
7. Roman Holiday
8. Wuthering Heights
9. Dead End
10. Ben-Hur

Very close at the top.
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Antares

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2011, 04:32:21 PM »
The Best Years of Our Lives
The Little Foxes
Mrs. Miniver
The Heiress
Jezebel
Dodsworth
The Letter
The Big Country
Ben-Hur


Dead End
The Desperate Hours
Wuthering Heights
The Westerner
Detective Story


Roman Holiday
The Children's Hour
Funny Girl

roujin

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #8 on: October 07, 2011, 02:34:36 PM »

The Best Years of Our Lives William Wyler, 1946

The prestige film par excellence? Three fellas make it back home after the war. Everything has changed for them. One has lost both of his hands and the other two feel it uneasy about what will happen when they finally enter their home. Things done changed indeed. Fredric March's character is probably the least interesting of the bunch as his situation is never really in jeopardy - Myrna Loy as his wife is always supportive and awesome. Even his kids seem to be amazing. Dana Andrews is looking for his wife who apparently took up a job at his some nightclub or other. His situation isn't that great. He doesn't want to return to his old job, but he has no skills and seemingly no interest in using his service to boost his chances. But there's always hope. Teresa Wright, beautiful light made flesh, is understanding and wonderful in ways that Virginia Mayo could never be, and there are more complications in store. Wyler often stages his scenes as exercises in deep focus photography (think of the scene where Harold Russell is playing in the piano while in the background Andrews is making an important phone call) and although sometimes it's a little distracting, it pays off dividends when there's no need for cutting into shots where characters are so clearly glancing tenderly at each other. Knowing that the gesture is there and happening in the background is all that important. The Russell strand of the film is also incredibly moving, and it was a real treat to see Cathy O'Donnell in something outside of her film noir mode (she's a peach and a half!) Teresa Wright, you can wreck my imaginary marriage any time. Oh, right, I wept like a baby.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2011, 02:38:27 PM by roujin »

sdedalus

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Re: Director's Best: William Wyler
« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2011, 02:37:42 PM »
Great movie.  The Russell scenes are a bit too obvious for me, but I love everything else about it.  March is a great drunk and he and Myrna Loy are great together (everyone is great with Myrna Loy).  Great.
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