Poll

What's your favorite film by Jacques Tourneur?

Cat People
2 (8.3%)
I Walked with a Zombie
2 (8.3%)
The Leopard Man
0 (0%)
Days of Glory
0 (0%)
Experiment Perilous
0 (0%)
Canyon Passage
2 (8.3%)
Out of the Past
11 (45.8%)
Berlin Express
0 (0%)
Easy Living
0 (0%)
Stars in My Crown
0 (0%)
The Flame and the Arrow
1 (4.2%)
Anne of the Indies
0 (0%)
Stranger on Horseback
0 (0%)
Wichita
0 (0%)
Great Day in the Morning
0 (0%)
Nightfall
0 (0%)
Night of the Demon
1 (4.2%)
The Fearmakers
0 (0%)
The Comedy of Terrors
0 (0%)
other (please specifiy)
0 (0%)
haven't seen any
4 (16.7%)
don't like any
1 (4.2%)

Total Members Voted: 23

Author Topic: Tourneur, Jacques  (Read 4719 times)

sdedalus

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2011, 12:11:06 AM »
I don't think I've ever heard of that, but if it's got Hedy Lamarr, I'll see it.
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roujin

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #11 on: August 11, 2011, 12:16:54 AM »
She looks quite good in this, yes.

Drew_Hunt

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2011, 07:59:09 PM »
Love Tourneur...

1. Canyon Passage
2. Cat People
3. Easy Living
4. I Walked with a Zombie
5. Out of the Past
6. Stars in My Crown
7. Night of the Demon/Curse of the Demon
8. The Fearmakers
9. Experiment Perilous
10. The Leopard Man
11. Wichita
12. Berlin Express
13. Anne of the Indies
14. War-Gods of the Deep (this is actually one of the very worst films I've ever seen)
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Totoro

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2011, 08:21:12 PM »
Out of the Past (B+)

 :-\

roujin

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2012, 11:57:44 PM »

Stars in my Crown Jacques Tourneur, 1950

Had no idea why I thought this was an actual western. It's more a of a small town community picture, like Ford's The Sun Shines Bright or To Kill a Mockingbird. Tourneur creates a vivid sense of community and place here. You get the schoolhouse with the well, the ailing doctor and his son, the great Arthur Hunicutt playing some guy named Chloroform (lol), some random black guy named Famous who teaches the Boy With the Green Hair how to fish or whatever. And then there's the wonderful Joel McCrea as the town parson, who for his first sermon, walks into a the saloon with his bible and his gun and starts preaching. I liked the tension between the doctor and the parson and how both men and their beliefs fit within the community; how they were different and how they complimented each other. The whole thing gets surprisingly dark for something I thought would be all nostalgic Americana. The film's portrayal of racism and hatred arising from economic instability is scary. The film's racists are just frustrated everyday folk looking for somebody to blame. Its reconciliatory vision is one that I found useful and deeply moving. Plus: other weird stuff that I already forgot.

sdedalus

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #15 on: January 22, 2012, 11:20:25 AM »
Such a good movie.  It's the film people want To Kill a Mockingbird to be.
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roujin

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2012, 05:19:11 PM »
That's one I need to revisit. Hopefully it can work for me as an actual movie without any of the school curriculum baggage that I always associate with it.

Antares

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2012, 05:27:12 PM »
Out of the Past

Cat People

I own the Val Lewton set, but still haven't watched The Leopard Man or I Walked with a Zombie:-[

roujin

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #18 on: June 28, 2012, 01:38:07 PM »
Nightfall Jacques Tourneur, 1957

I had words, but then I found this by a Mr. Greg X at mubi.com

"Nightfall can be considered a mistaken noir, or a film that starts as if it were a noir using all the familiar tropes or conventions of the genre, a paranoid loner on the run in a foreboding urban landscape pursued by both ruthless criminals and a government man with a femme fatale for a companion, and then undermines them all one by one, the woman is true and only seeks to help, the government man turns out to be an insurance agent whom he befriends and even the thugs are given a soul, if not fully redeemable, the dark night of the city gives way to a country morning in a field of blinding white."

So, yeah, great movie. It's been a while since I've seen a film start off with such an aura of mystery - whatever ails the protagonist feels like something almost hidden deep down, but all expressed thru the film's mise en scene (the street corner with the cigarette, the bar counter, etc). I think I'll be ordering that Fujiwara book after all.

roujin

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Re: Directors Best Poll - Jacques Tourneur
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2013, 08:10:43 PM »

The Flame and The Arrow (Jacques Tourneur, 1950)

Burt Lancaster is a mountain man and as such he is free to do the things we are not. Like challenge the occupying forces of this one other kingdom. In the ensuing struggle, his kid is kidnapped, so he has to get him back. The whole thing's a lot of rollicking fun, full of those wonderful technicolor shadows, ala Canyon Passage, and elaborate staging. Lancaster's able body is the star, and the film's final moments are fantastic - acrobatic trojan horses, revolution, roujin.