Poll

What's your favorite film by Maurice Pialat?

L'enfance nue (Naked Childhood)
2 (10.5%)
Nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble (We Won't Grow Old Together)
1 (5.3%)
La gueule ouverte (The Mouth Agape)
0 (0%)
Passe ton bac d'abord (Graduate First)
0 (0%)
Loulou
1 (5.3%)
À nos amours
3 (15.8%)
Police
0 (0%)
Sous le soleil de Satan (Under the Sun of Satan)
1 (5.3%)
Van Gogh
1 (5.3%)
Le garçu
0 (0%)
other (specify)
1 (5.3%)
Haven't seen any
9 (47.4%)
Don't like any
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 18

Author Topic: Pialat, Maurice  (Read 4312 times)

worm@work

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #10 on: August 03, 2012, 02:52:50 AM »
You give good screenshot, worm.

I had to leave off some of the best ones .. not because they weren't tasteful but coz flieger's responses to them would be anything but ;D.

worm@work

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #11 on: August 03, 2012, 02:53:53 AM »




Isabelle aux Dombes | 1951
An early experimental short from Pialat that's pretty different from everything else I've seen from him thus far. Montage of images that eventually all seem to signal death and decay with the short culminating in a female Charon ferrying a boat across the river Styx. Shows him experimenting with the medium a bit with the use of negative images to represent ghosts and reversing the image to show a bird flying backwards and so on. Stark and apocalyptic.

worm@work

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2012, 04:12:02 AM »

Congrès eucharistique diocésain | 1953
A pretty straight-up documentary of some religious ceremony or event at a small village somewhere. It's all fairly standard and unremarkable barring the super rapid cuts which was present in the Dombes short as well but there it made sense given the experimental nature of it etc. It works here as well for the most part in terms of capturing all sorts of things going on during and around the ceremony. Best moments are when Pialat's camera gazes away from the main proceedings and simply captures people laughing and talking and doing stuff.

worm@work

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2012, 06:40:48 AM »

Drôles de bobines | 1957
Pialat takes a stab at emulating or at least paying tribute to early goofy silent comedies. It has some fun visual gags but isn't really memorable otherwise. Again, quite a bit of rapid cutting and some playing around with film speed and the like. I am getting the impression he was really just trying his hand at as much different stuff as he could at this time.


Bondo

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2012, 10:13:08 AM »
If you get a chance to watch Katell Quillévéré's Love Like Poison I'd highly recommend it. It feels heavily influenced by A Nos Amours but for me buffs down the rough edges that kept me from loving Pialat's film.

worm@work

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2012, 10:59:31 AM »




L'Ombre Familiere | 1958

This perhaps comes closest to Pialat's later preoccupations and yet, it's quite removed from those. But at least, this one is intriguing and interesting. It's a sort of a love story meets ghost story comprising mainly of a montage of sequences set to a sci-fi score. Also seems to comment on filmmaking, creating art etc. as a form of catharsis. Good stuff.

worm@work

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2012, 11:00:41 AM »
If you get a chance to watch Katell Quillévéré's Love Like Poison I'd highly recommend it. It feels heavily influenced by A Nos Amours but for me buffs down the rough edges that kept me from loving Pialat's film.

I'll definitely try and get to Love Like Poison but those so-called rough edges might just be my favorite thing about the Pialat (esp. if you're referring to the improvised nature of it, the lack of a straight narrative etc.).

worm@work

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2012, 06:42:58 PM »

Janine | 1962
The most New Wavey looking of all the Pialats I've seen so far. Pretty and stuff but yeah, unremarkable mostly.

Bondo

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2012, 08:03:07 PM »
For me the rough edges were the wildly contrasting acting styles. Some characters underplaying, others going way big.

worm@work

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Re: Director's Best: Maurice Pialat
« Reply #19 on: August 08, 2012, 05:08:44 AM »

Bosphore | 1964
These are series of short 10-15 min documentary shorts that Pialat made in and about Turkey apparently using some leftover film stock from Alain Robbe-Grillet. This one's the only one in color and is gorgeous to look at. It's pretty great. The short is set almost entirely at the Istanbul harbor, a location with much historical significance located right between Europe and Asia. Pialat uses this poetic voiceover narration that kinda reminded me of Lawrence Durrell's Alexandria Quartet and it's all pretty lovely.



Pehlivan | 1964
Interesting that we have the same word for wrestler/bodybuilder in Hindi as well. So in this one, Pialat shoots some kind of wrestling tournament. Lots of close-ups of wrestlers oiling their bodies and the combat is photographed almost like a homoerotic dance. This is then paralled with similar closeups of belly-dancers whose bodies are on display in much the same way as the men. Pretty.



Byzance | 1964
This one's a somewhat melancholic look at the stuff that's lost to history over time thanks to the ravages of war and other forms of destruction. The film mostly focuses on the conquest of the Ottoman empire at the hands of the Romans and uses his camera to show us various structures that have either wholly or partially replaced older structures that were probably significant in their day. Some kind of meditation on how a portrait of a city can never quite capture a city really or something.. 



Corne d'or | 1964
A loving and lovely portrait of Ottoman architecture and the blending of different faiths and cultures in Istanbul.



Maître Galip | 1964
My favorite of the bunch along with Bosphore. The film follows an impoverished poet as he looks back on his life. Pialat uses the poet to comment more broadly on the life of the working class in Istanbul. The voiceover in the other shorts is replaced here with Galip's poetry making the whole thing really evocative and bittersweet.



Istanbul | 1964
Juxtaposition of the newer more modern and more Westernized parts of Istanbul against the older neighborhoods that still retain some of the last vestiges of the Ottoman culture and architecture. The night shots of traffic jams are the best parts.

I am probably going to get to go to Turkey next year on work etc. Should be good.