Poll

What's your favorite film by Guillermo del Toro?

haven't seen any
0 (0%)
don't like any
2 (4.9%)
Cronos
1 (2.4%)
Mimic
0 (0%)
The Devil's Backbone
0 (0%)
Blade II
4 (9.8%)
Hellboy
4 (9.8%)
Pan's Labyrinth
24 (58.5%)
Hellboy II: The Golden Army
2 (4.9%)
Pacific Rim
1 (2.4%)
Crimson Peak
0 (0%)
The Shape of Water
3 (7.3%)

Total Members Voted: 40

Author Topic: del Toro, Guillermo  (Read 2618 times)

1SO

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #50 on: December 28, 2017, 12:07:44 AM »
Added The Shape of Water if anyone wants to change their vote.

Bondo

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #51 on: December 28, 2017, 05:13:44 AM »
I do want this.

roujin

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #52 on: December 28, 2017, 04:04:56 PM »
two recent viewings:

Pan's Labyrinth (2006)

Del Toro spares no amount of effort into bringing to life his fantastical images and special effects, imbuing them with wonder and danger. But the sense of mystery and beauty he affords to Ofelia and her adventures, and how he complicates them, is nowhere to be found when dealing with the fascist officers. Here his imagination stops and we are given caricatures: brutal and deranged machismo instead of anything resembling an inner life (props such as the gold watch act as a shortcut to character) and he is dispatched with an audience-pleasing punchline. Regardless, Del Toro's mixture of history and fantasy is engaging as his craftsmanship is usually solid.

The Shape of Water (2017)

Although I admire the quasi-transgressive goofiness of the film, Del Toro's romance remains theoretical, livened only a few visual ideas and scenarios (filling up the room with water is the key moment for me). The rest, like Pan's Labyrinth before it, falls flat due to an imbalance with the care given over to the conflicts (here of history, suburbia middle management oppression). Shannon is left with his damaged car, missing fingers, and little else to do. Cinema romance is the escape for the characters, and yet one of the film's low points is the musical number: another cinephilic gesture in a film filled with nothing but them. It also seems redundant when so much of the early scenes are given over to Jenkins' love for Hollywood cinema, always on the TV. And perhaps the romantic struggle between this artifice and the political reality is best seen in the encounter between Jenkins and his crush at the diner: no need for blood, this is the moment that cuts the deepest.

Knocked Out Loaded

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #53 on: January 01, 2018, 02:23:17 AM »
Hellboy, 45˚
Pan's Labyrinth, 40˚
Crimson Peak, 20˚
Pacific Rim, 10˚
Blade II, 10˚
« Last Edit: March 23, 2018, 02:00:34 PM by Knocked Out Loaded »
I might remember it all differently tomorrow.

DarkeningHumour

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #54 on: March 07, 2018, 01:03:11 PM »
The Shape of Water
Pan's Labyrinth

Blade II
Crimson Peak

Hellboy
Hellboy 2

Pacific Rim

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Sam the Cinema Snob

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #55 on: Yesterday at 04:52:23 PM »
The Shape of Water (2017)

This film is an egg. The surface is sleek, pristine, and polished, it glistens with this sort of pristine purity, a film so in love with films, with romance and with period pieces that it would be hard to ask for a bigger love letter to Hollywood cinema in both its golden era and monster movie glory.

But the film is also perilously fragile and applying any pressure to it makes the whole thing start to crack and fall apart. For such a vivid and imaginative film, there’s no gripping substance to the film. Once the actual mess of the film oozes out, it’s like having a raw egg slip through your fingers: gunky, insubstantial and messy.

The film meanders aimlessly through most of its runtime, somewhere between a series of unlikely romantic meetings between deaf janitor Elisa Esposito (Sally Hawkins) and an Amphibian Man (Doug Jones) before morphing into a cold war drama where security man Richard Strickland (Michael Shannon) and Dr. Hoffstetler (Michael Stuhlbarg) argue over the best way to use the creature.

Both stories are told in broad strokes with vague characters that make confusion decisions in a film where motives are central to making the story feel believable. The breaking through of the extraordinary into the ordinary requires more solid character moments than this film wants to develop.

What’s left in a lot of beautiful sets on which some fine actors are allowed to play out this drama. The film’s almost worth seeing alone for Sally Hawkins’ strong, occasionally gut-wrenching performance that makes you forget she doesn’t have a single spoken line. Michael Shannon is his usual scenery chewing self here and brings in just the right dosage of slightly unhinged malice. Michael Stuhlbarg is the final stand-out here as this man who has to go toe to toe with Shannon’s energy and somehow diffuse the situation.

A pretty film with some good performances certainly will be enough for some moviegoers, but from talent like this, there could have been so much more beneath the surface here. It lacks both the best frights of a good horror movie or the swelling beats of a good romance or thrilling period drama. There’s plenty to like in The Shape of Water, but nothing to love.