Poll

What's your favorite film by Guillermo del Toro?

haven't seen any
0 (0%)
don't like any
2 (5%)
Cronos
1 (2.5%)
Mimic
0 (0%)
The Devil's Backbone
0 (0%)
Blade II
4 (10%)
Hellboy
4 (10%)
Pan's Labyrinth
24 (60%)
Hellboy II: The Golden Army
2 (5%)
Pacific Rim
1 (2.5%)
Crimson Peak
0 (0%)
The Shape of Water
2 (5%)

Total Members Voted: 39

Author Topic: del Toro, Guillermo  (Read 2379 times)

1SO

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #50 on: December 28, 2017, 12:07:44 AM »
Added The Shape of Water if anyone wants to change their vote.

Bondo

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #51 on: December 28, 2017, 05:13:44 AM »
I do want this.

roujin

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #52 on: December 28, 2017, 04:04:56 PM »
two recent viewings:

Pan's Labyrinth (2006)

Del Toro spares no amount of effort into bringing to life his fantastical images and special effects, imbuing them with wonder and danger. But the sense of mystery and beauty he affords to Ofelia and her adventures, and how he complicates them, is nowhere to be found when dealing with the fascist officers. Here his imagination stops and we are given caricatures: brutal and deranged machismo instead of anything resembling an inner life (props such as the gold watch act as a shortcut to character) and he is dispatched with an audience-pleasing punchline. Regardless, Del Toro's mixture of history and fantasy is engaging as his craftsmanship is usually solid.

The Shape of Water (2017)

Although I admire the quasi-transgressive goofiness of the film, Del Toro's romance remains theoretical, livened only a few visual ideas and scenarios (filling up the room with water is the key moment for me). The rest, like Pan's Labyrinth before it, falls flat due to an imbalance with the care given over to the conflicts (here of history, suburbia middle management oppression). Shannon is left with his damaged car, missing fingers, and little else to do. Cinema romance is the escape for the characters, and yet one of the film's low points is the musical number: another cinephilic gesture in a film filled with nothing but them. It also seems redundant when so much of the early scenes are given over to Jenkins' love for Hollywood cinema, always on the TV. And perhaps the romantic struggle between this artifice and the political reality is best seen in the encounter between Jenkins and his crush at the diner: no need for blood, this is the moment that cuts the deepest.

Knocked Out Loaded

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Re: del Toro, Guillermo
« Reply #53 on: January 01, 2018, 02:23:17 AM »
Hellboy, 45˚
Pan's Labyrinth, 40˚
Crimson Peak, 20˚
Blade II, 10˚
I might remember it all differently tomorrow.

 

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